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Bengals offensive line one of NFL's best in 2015

The offensive line was once again a strength for the Bengals this past season.

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Troy Taormina-USA TODAY Sports

The Bengals offensive line has routinely been one of the best in football over Marvin Lewis' tenure, so it's no surprise that trend continued in 2014.

Pro Football Focus put out their pass-blocking efficiency ratings, which account for sacks, hurries, and QB hits surrendered relative to the number of pass protection snaps. The Bengals' line came in at No. 3 for the regular season with an 85.0 rating, a mere 0.1 points behind Green Bay in the No. 2 slot:

# Team Passing Plays Sacks Hits Hurries Total Pressure Allowed PBE
1 DEN 626 12 25 74 111 86.2
2 GB 595 18 18 76 112 85.1
3 CIN 546 12 22 71 104 85.0
4 BLT 583 13 21 83 117 84.4
5 DAL 518 9 17 81 107 84.1

Not only that, but the 104 total pressures Cincinnati allowed were the fewest of any NFL team.

Here's a look at the rankings for teams that made the postseason:

# Team Passing Plays PBE
1 DEN 626 86.2
2 GB 595 85.1
3 CIN 546 85.0
4 BLT 583 84.4
5 DAL 518 84.1
7 PIT 651 82.3
16 DET 664 79.4
18 ARZ 611 78.8
20 NE 647 78.5
21 IND 726 78.2
23 SEA 548 77.7
26 CAR 623 77.0

The common theme is that playoff teams tend to have a rating of at least 80, and each of the top-five teams made it to the playoffs However, both New England and Seattle bucked that trend by reaching the Super Bowl with 78.5 and 77.7 ratings respectively.

While it's clear a dominant offensive line greatly increases the odds of making it to the playoffs, it's obvious that you can not only win in the playoffs without one, but make a deep postseason run as well.

For the mathematically inclined, the PBE formula looks like this:

(1– ((Sacks + (0.75*(Hits + Hurries))/ Pass Blocking Snaps))*100 = PBE Rating