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NFL Draft 2015: DeVante Parker Profile

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DeVante Parker is an elite redzone target who can out-physical most cornerbacks for a contested ball.

Jamie Rhodes-USA TODAY Sports

DeVante Parker, Wide Receiver, Louisville

HEIGHT: 6'3"

ARM LENGTH: 33 1/4"

WEIGHT: 209 lbs.

HANDS: 9 1/4"

40-YARD DASH: 4.45 SEC

BENCH PRESS: 17 REPS

VERTICAL JUMP: 36.5 INCH

BROAD JUMP: 125.0 INCH

One of the most explosive pass-catchers in college football the past three years was Louisville's Devante Parker. Though having Teddy Bridgewater his first three years made life easier, Parker was nearly unstoppable with whoever threw him the ball.

After leading the Cards with six touchdown receptions as a true freshman, Parker exploded onto the national scene with 40 catches, 744 yards and 10 touchdowns as a sophomore. Of Parker’s 40 catches that season, 13 went for 20 or more yards and seven of his 10 scores were also 20+ yards.

Parker ended his junior season with 55 receptions for 885 yards and tied a school record with 12 touchdowns. His 12 scores were tied for 10th nationally and led the AAC.

Though Parker missed the first seven games of his senior season with a foot injury, he still managed to catch 43 passes for 855 yards and five touchdowns in the final six games. He had 120+ yards in five of the six games, including a career-high 214 yards against Florida State, who have a pair of top-50 cornerback prospects in P.J. Williams and Ronald Darby.

Through his four years in college, Parker caught 156 passes for 2,775 yards (17.7 avg) and 33 scores. He is an elite redzone target, and can out-physical most cornerbacks in college football, and outside of a double-team, is as close to an unguardable receiver as you'll see this year.

Here is his ESPN scouting report:

Separation Skills 2 Lacks elite initial burst but does a solid job with hands and longer frame getting off press. Not the most sudden athlete, and struggles at times to gain separation on quick-hitting routes versus top-tier CBs (FSU's P.J. Williams, for example). But he is crisper getting in and out of breaks on intermediate routes. Establishes initial leverage, and then uses his long frame to create late separation. Shows savvy setting up defenders. Good hand-fighter who uses subtle push-off to separate at top of stem. Above-average locating and exploiting pockets versus zone. Consistently works back to the ball on scramble rules.
Ball Skills 2 Ball skills are good but not elite. Dropped just two passes on eight tapes studied (from both 2013 and 2014). Focus seemed to improve in 2014. Shows ability to make tough over-head catches. Mostly high-points the ball and attacks with hands. Occasionally will body catch, but usually when ball is behind him. Tracks deep ball well and shows consistent ability to adjust while tracking over shoulder. Good body control and regularly adjusts to balls thrown outside of frame. Occasionally will fight the ball thrown below waist.
Big play ability 2 Deceptively fast because of long strides. Top-end speed is a notch below elite. Legitimate vertical threat with length, body control and leaping ability. Does a great job at creating late separation on deep ball. Very quick to transition upfield after catch. Lacks elite initial burst and not overly elusive in space, but can make first defender miss with sharp cut. Also kills pursuit angles with long strides when he catches some daylight. Production matches tape, as he averaged 19.9 YPC in 2014 and 17.8 YPC for career.
Competitiveness 2 More consistent effort and production in 2014. After missing first seven games with injury, he played with urgency in each of remaining six games as a senior. Plays with swagger. Tough and doesn't back down when challenged. Short-term memory. Doesn't let a drop snowball. Willing to work middle of field. Sufficient effort and gets in the way as a blocker. Capable of sustaining longer at times.