clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

2015 NFL Draft Profile: Baylor Quarterback Bryce Petty

New, comments

We take a look at one of the top quarterback prospects in a weak 2015 draft class, Baylor's Bryce Petty.

Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports

Height/Weight: 6'3", 230 pounds

2014 Stats: 3,855 passing yards, 28 passing touchdowns, 7 interceptions, 63.1 completion percentage, 157.8 rating; 101 rushing yards and 6 rushing touchdowns.

Combine Results: 4.87 40-yard dash, 121-inch broad jump, 34-inch vertical jump.

Draft Projection: Third round

Strengths: Possesses good size, athleticism and solid throwing ability. Petty has the "it" intangibles that most clubs look for in a quarterback and had two uber-productive statistical seasons with Baylor. He had two incredible performances in the team's two toughest match-ups: TCU and a Cotton Bowl game versus Michigan State. Petty combined for nine passing touchdowns and 1,060 passing yards in those two games alone. He shows pretty reliable consistency on deep passes, prompting for longtime NFL quarterback Mark Brunell to believe that Petty has the ability to be a pleasant surprise in this year's draft (based on his review on "The Herd With Colin Cowherd").

Weaknesses: Petty is a "system guy" who has a lot of work ahead of him in the form of reading progressions and getting under center. There are some similarities between what Petty and Oregon's Marcus Mariota were asked to do, but Mariota had far more statistical production. Even with the 34 total touchdowns on the season, some felt disappointed by Petty's 2014 campaign, with a lot of that resulting from a back injury. There are some concerns of that back injury being a nagging, long-term issue as well.

Background: Petty was an early-season Heisman candidate, but others emerged while Petty faded into the background a bit. Along with UCLA's Brett Hundley, this once-promising draft crop at the position fizzled out after such lofty expectations. Petty has the tools to be an NFL starter, but he'll need to develop skills that his Baylor predecessor, Robert Griffin III, has failed to grasp after his own promising rookie campaign.